Last edited by Kigalrajas
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Index to the Pharsalia of Lucan found in the catalog.

Index to the Pharsalia of Lucan

George William Mooney

Index to the Pharsalia of Lucan

by George William Mooney

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  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Hodges, Figgis in Dublin .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lucan, -- 39-65. -- Indexes.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby George W. Mooney.
    SeriesHermathena -- 44, Suppl. 1
    The Physical Object
    Pagination309 p. ;
    Number of Pages309
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15553183M

    When the conspiracy was discovered, Lucan was given the option of suicide or death; he chose suicide, and recited several lines of his poetry while he died (possibly Book III, l. ). Lucan's "Pharsalia" was left (probably) unfinished upon his death, coincidentally breaking off at almost the exact same point where Julius Caesar broke off. The epic poem “Pharsalia” on the war between Julius Caesar and Pompey is considered Lucan’s magnum opus, although it remained unfinished at his death, stopping abruptly in the middle of the 10th book. Lucan skilfully adapts Virgil’s “Aeneid” and the traditional elements of the epic genre (often by inversion or negation) as a kind of negative compositional model for his new “anti Ratings:

    The Pharsalia has been described by Ahl as "a political act as well as a political poem." Written when Nero's true nature could no longer be denied, it is a harrowing portrait of the disintegration of Rome, civil war, and the triumph of a single will. Lucan's unfinished epic was a . The rape of Proserpine, from Claudian. In three books. With the episode of Sextus and Erichtho, from Lucan's Pharsalia, book VI. Translated by Mr.. edition, corrected, and .

    Lucan’s Civil War Civil War (also known as the Pharsalia) must stand as a contender for the weirdest and craziest epic poem of all time. I recommend reading the introduction below first, then reading through the commentary posts in order. Overview. The unfinished Pharsalia narrates the Roman Civil War's first phase, which ended almost thirty years later in the victory of Caesar's grandnephew Octavius (Augustus), over the forces of Mark Anthony and the Egyptian queen Cleopatra at the naval battle of Actium. It breaks off with Caesar trapped in Alexandria by the Egyptians. Book One. Lucan begins his epic with themes and images.


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Index to the Pharsalia of Lucan by George William Mooney Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book I The nature of the war. I sing of a worse than civil war, of war fought between kinsmen over Pharsalia’s plains, of wickedness deemed justice; of how a powerful people turned their own right hands against themselves.

Genre/Form: Indexes: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mooney, George W. (George William), Index to the Pharsalia of Lucan. Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, “Pharsalia” (also kown as “De Bello Civili” or “On the Civil War”) is an epic poem in ten books by the Roman poet Lucan, left unfinished on the poets’ death in 65 gh incomplete, it is often considered the greatest epic poem of the Silver Age of Latin literature, and it tells the story of the civil war between Julius Caesar and the forces of the Roman Senate led by Pompey Ratings: Lucan The Civil War: Pharsalia Browse below; Download; Book I The Civil War begins Book II Pompey in retreat Book III Conflict in the Mediterranean Book IV Victory for Caesar in Spain Book V Caesar the dictator in Illyria Book VI Thessaly: Erichtho the witch Book VII Pharsalia: 'a whole world died'.

ANNAEVS LVCANVS (39 – 65 A.D.) DE BELLO CIVILI SIVE PHARSALIA. Liber I: Liber II: Liber III: Liber IV: Liber V: Liber VI: Liber VII: Liber VIII: Liber IX.

Lucan's great poem, Pharsalia, recounts events surrounding the decisive battle fought near Pharsalus in 48 B.C.

during the civil war between the forces of Pompey and Julius the subject of this unfinished masterpiece is historical, many of its features are characteristic of epic poetry: Rousing battle scenes; tales of witches, monsters, and miracle; detailed catalogues; intricate /5(3).

The Pharsalia has not been previously translated into English prose; but there have been two poetical versions, one by Thomas May, inthe other by Nicholas Rowe.

The latter is too well known to require comment; the former, though replete with the quaint expressions peculiar to the early part of the seventeenth century, has the merit of. ThriftBooks sells millions of used books at the lowest everyday prices.

We personally assess every book's quality and offer rare, out-of-print treasures. We deliver the joy of reading in % recyclable packaging with free standard shipping on US orders over $ M.

Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia Sir Edward Ridley, Ed. ("Agamemnon", "Hom. ", "denarius") book: book 1 book 2 book 3 book 4 book 5 book 6 book 7 book 8 book 9 book card: lines lines lines lines when they were written: yet the text itself does not aid such a suggestion; and the view generally taken.

Civil War is the only surviving work of Lucan, a Roman writer from the 1st century. Written during the reign of Nero, Lucans Civil War was arguably the last great epic poem written in antiquity (at least in the West). The poem as we have it is unfinished (Nero ordered Lucan to commit suicide at the age of 25), but whats left is a fairly complete story of the war between Julius Caesar and /5.

Complete summary of Christopher Marlowe's Lucan's First Book (Pharsalia). eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of Lucan's First Book (Pharsalia). Lucan's epic poem on the civil war between Caesar and Pompey, unfinished at the time of his death, stands beside the poems of Virgil and Ovid in the first rank of Latin epic.

This newly annotated, free verse translation conveys the full force of Lucan's writing and his grimly realistic view of the subject/5(3). This edition is of Book I of Lucan's epic poem, De Bello Civili, sometimes also known as the Pharsalia, a great work of the Silver Age of Latin I summarises the background to the civil war between Caesar and Pompey and takes the narrative as far as Caesar's crossing of the Rubicon and the outbreak of panic in the city of Rome, including many signs and by: 1.

Full text of "Lucan: the civil war books I-X (Pharsalia)" See other formats. Lucan, Latin in full Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, (born ad 39, Corduba [now Córdoba], Spain—d Rome [Italy]), Roman poet and republican patriot whose historical epic, the Bellum civile, better known as the Pharsalia because of its vivid account of that battle, is remarkable as the single major Latin epic poem that eschewed the intervention of the gods.

book 1 book 2 book 3 book 4 book 5 book 6 book 7 book 8 book 9 book 10 card: lines lines lines lines lines lines lines ff. Lucan (M. Annaeus Lucanus, 39&#;65 CE), son of wealthy M. Annaeus Mela and nephew of Seneca, was born at Corduba (Cordova) in Spain and was brought as a baby to Rome.

In 60 CE at a festival in Emperor Nero's honour Lucan praised him in a panegyric and was promoted to one or two minor Brand: Harvard. Lucan's great poem, Pharsalia, recounts events surrounding the decisive battle fought near Pharsalus in 48 B.C. during the civil war between the forces of Pompey and Julius the subject of this unfinished masterpiece is historical, many of its features are characteristic of epic poetry: Rousing battle scenes; tales of witches, monsters, and miracle; detailed catalogues; intricate Brand: Cornell University Press.

LUCAN’S PHARSALIA Book I Lines A New Translation with Text and Commentary By E. Campbell Edward Campbell Media: Bozeman, MT First Edition. Lucan (M. Annaeus Lucanus, 39–65 CE), son of wealthy M. Annaeus Mela and nephew of Seneca, was born at Corduba (Cordova) in Spain and was brought as a baby to 60 CE at a festival in Emperor Nero's honour Lucan praised him in a panegyric and was promoted to one or two minor offices.

But having defeated Nero in a poetry contest he was interdicted from further recitals or publication. Marcus Annaeus Lucanus (3 November 39 AD – 30 April 65 AD), better known in English as Lucan (/ ˈ l uː k ən /), was a Roman poet, born in Corduba (modern-day Córdoba), in Hispania is regarded as one of the outstanding figures of the Imperial Latin period, known in particular for his epic youth and speed of composition set him apart from other : AD 3 Novem Corduba, Hispania Baetica.

Lucan: the civil war books I-X (Pharsalia) by Lucan, ; Duff, J. D. (James Duff), Publication date Topics Pharsalus, Battle of, Farsala, Greece, 48 B.C Publisher Includes bibliographical references and index 35 39 Addeddate Call number AIG Camera 1Ds External-identifier urn:oclc:record Pages: Lucan's great poem, Pharsalia, recounts events surrounding the decisive battle fought near Pharsalus in 48 B.C.

during the civil war between the forces of Pompey and Julius Caesar. Though the subject of this unfinished masterpiece is historical, many.